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God entreats us to choose life

2 Corinthians 13:5

 

(5) Examine yourselves as to whether you are in the faith. Test yourselves. Do you not know yourselves, that Jesus Christ is in you?—unless indeed you are disqualified.

New King James Version   Change your email Bible version

 

God, through Paul, commands us to examine our faith and to test ourselves. How can we know the strength of our faith—our belief in the words of God? One of the ways is to examine our fears and worries.

 

Nehemiah writes, “For this reason he was hired, that I should be afraid and act that way and sin, so that they might have cause for an evil report, that they might reproach me” (Nehemiah 6:13). Why did Nehemiah call being afraid a sin? Because fear and worry call God a liar, insinuating that His words about His sovereignty, love, power, and faithfulness are not to be trusted. Fear and worry mirror the attitudes of a faithless Satan who believes God exists but does not believe what He says.

 

Philippians 4:6 tells us, “Be anxious for nothing.” In other words, we are commanded, “Don’t worry about anything,” another of God’s absolutes. To have fear, worry, anxiety, or forebodings question God’s goodness and care. They display a lack of faith in His promises of wise and gracious providence and cast doubts on the depth of the love God and Christ have for us. If we cannot trust God, how can He ever trust us? Why would Christ marry forever someone who doubts His love?

 

Rather than give in to fear and worry, we can choose—an action—to believe God and His love. If we believe in the depth of the love God (John 17:23) and Christ (John 15:13) have for us, believing those words, faith in that perfect love will cast out fear (I John 4:18) so that we can say as David did: “I will fear no evil; for You are with me” (Psalm 23:4).

 

In Psalm 78:22 (New Living Translation—NLT), David succinctly cuts to the heart of Israel’s problem, and by extension, ours: “. . . for they did not believe God or trust him to care for them.” Doubting God’s love for us is at the core of the sin of faithlessness. This doubt was a major characteristic of our ancestors, ancient Israel. “. . . because the people of Israel argued with Moses and tested the Lord by saying, ‘Is the Lord going to take care of us or not?'” [Exodus 17:7 (NLT)] They never overcame this sin of faithlessness. We must. The stakes are so much higher.

 

It is sobering to consider the fate of the fearful and unbelieving and the rank they are given in the list found in Revelation 21:8: “But the cowardly [fearful, KJV], unbelieving [faithless, RSV], abominable, murderers, sexually immoral, sorcerers, idolaters, and all liars shall have their part in the lake which burns with fire and brimstone, which is the second death.”

 

God tested the faith of Adam and Eve and of Abraham. The former failed, the latter succeeded. Eventually, God will put every human being to the same test.

 

As we cope with these tests we need to stir up (II Timothy 1:6) and exercise that gift of faith God gave us at the beginning, to get back to that first love and dedication to the words and promises God has given us.

 

We have the same choice as Adam and Eve, ancient Israel, and Abraham had. It is our decision to make: to believe God or to believe what we see—the visible circumstances we face. Faith is life (Habakkuk 2:4), and faithlessness is sin (Romans 14:23) and therefore death (Romans 6:23). God entreats us to choose life (Deuteronomy 30:19).

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